A woman smiling

 

Written by Jacob Terranova

 

Funeral directors have a lot in common with each other.

 

They get the same accreditation, licensing, and training. They do the job of five people — part grief counselor, part cosmetologist, part office administrator, part marketer, and of course, director of funerals, wakes, memorial services, and burials.

 

It’s no easy task. Of course, the most common aspect funeral directors share is their compassion to help the families in their community.

 

While funeral directors are all called one way or another to the profession, their backgrounds can differ. Out of the 25,000 funeral directors in the United States, which one are you?

 

Like us on Facebook and sign up for our newsletter to stay updated on funeral news and trends!

Rural Director

The small town hero. It could even be multiple small towns you serve over a large area. But you won’t let long distances stop you. A long drive to make a house visit is nothing to you — not if it means comforting the families in your community.

 

While operating in a rural area can be hard, there are plenty of aspects that make the rural funeral director special. A rural director doesn’t face as much competition. Your home is the only funeral provider for miles around — making you a vital pillar of the community.

 

You also have strong small-town traditions. Families want the traditional burial or the town hall potluck memorial service. Your involvement in the community goes beyond funerals.

 

Big City Director

Living in the big city is a rush, and it’s no different for a funeral director working in one. You get to serve a variety of different families. While each service might be a little different, the level of compassion and care you provide isn’t.

 

Being a funeral director in the city is no walk in the park. Competition in the city can be greater.

 

You’re also not immune to the hardships city life can bring. You see families losing loved ones too soon to things like the opioid epidemic or violence. Through it all, you strive to give the families the very best.

 

As a funeral director in the city, you also get to be a little more creative. Families are open to unique and personal services — and bigger cities have access to resources to help provide them. That means you get to use your imagination and make sure each person gets a special service.

 

Generational

The funeral home is in your blood. It’s been passed through your family for generations. You remember running around coffin displays at 12 years old. You were inspired by how your parents were able to help families heal, and now you carry the torch proudly.

 

Working in a family funeral home has some great perks. Sure, working with family can cause occasional quarrels, but at the end of the day, it’s about the personal care — from one family to another. The family funeral home has deep ties to their communities and is able to inject years of tradition into each and every service.

 

First Generation

This might be your first rodeo when it comes to the funeral home, but that doesn’t stop you. You were called to this profession, and your drive to provide families with the best shines through.

 

As a first-timer, you’ve got some work cut out for you. But you also have so much to bring to the table. Your fresh perspective is welcomed by the families you serve. You bring new ideas, hard work, and passion — all of which will help you to stand out in your community.

 

Classic

Tradition is a beautiful thing. In a time where society moves too quickly, tradition brings the familiar, it brings comfort. That’s what your funeral home specializes in, and families appreciate it.

 

The classic funeral director is often misunderstood. Just because you recognize the importance of tradition, doesn’t mean you’re not open to new ideas. In fact, you’re often looking for new services or technology that can help build on your traditions and make them more meaningful. At the end of the day, you want to give the best possible memorial service for your families and the deceased.

 

New Age

The new age funeral director is always looking forward. You’re up on the latest trends, blogs, and funeral news. You recognize that society’s views on funerals are changing, and it’s important that you’re able to meet their requests.

 

It’s not just about the funeral services either. You take the extra effort to modernize your funeral home to provide convenience and comfort to your families.

 

You understand the importance of celebrating a life, and the ceremonies you direct reflect that. Families have come to appreciate that about you and your funeral home. You embrace change and challenges head-on.

 

Which One Are You?

No two funeral directors are alike. But what makes them different is what makes them special. And while funeral directors come from all walks of life, they all were called to the profession by their compassion, heart, and desire to comfort their families.

 

A funeral director is one of the most misunderstood professions. But that doesn’t stop you from doing what you do best. The care you provide to families is what makes you so important — no matter what type of funeral director you are.

 

What do you think? Are they any other kinds of funeral directors you feel we left out? Let us know your thoughts in the comments below!