Mom and daughter holding hands

 

Written by Jacob Terranova

 

There was a survey conducted by the Harris Poll that found some surprising results. More than a quarter of Americans reported that they do not know — or felt they knew — their mother as well as they would have liked.

 

This Mother’s Day, don’t put it off. Spend some time to learn more about mom. To make the most of the holiday, we’ve put together a list of questions and ways you can better capture your mom’s story.

 

Questions to Ask Mom

Here are 15 important questions to ask. These will help you learn not only more about your mom’s personality but also can help you learn about important information, such as senior care options.

 

  1. What songs did you dance to growing up?
  2. What was your earliest childhood memory? Or your favorite childhood memory?
  3. What is the story behind your name?
  4. What was your childhood like?
  5. Did you have a favorite teacher or subject in school?
  6. Who were your best friends growing up? What’s your favorite memory with them?
  7. What was your first high school dance like? Who did you go with?
  8. What are you most proud of?
  9. What’s the most important lesson you’ve learned in life?
  10. How do you want others to remember you?
  11. What have you enjoyed most about your life so far?
  12. What would like to accomplish in the next five years? The next 10?
  13. What can I do to help you maintain the best quality of life as you get older?
  14. What are three life lessons that you’ve learned that you want to pass on to me?
  15. Is there anything you regret not having asked your parents?

Want to ask more questions? Here are 24 more questions to ask.

 

Ways to Learn and Capture Her Story

After you’ve learned more about your mom, consider capturing her story. That way you can keep those memories alive and share them with future generations. Here are three ways to get started:

Learning About Mom, Even After She’s Gone

For some, Mother’s Day is a time to look back and reflect on mom. Even after she’s gone, it’s still possible to learn more about who she was. Here are three ways how:

  • Ask family and friends that were close to her. Hearing stories from others can help shape a new identity in your mind as to who your mother was.
  • Learn through her old possessions. Search through the attic. Read old notes and letters. Even old household items can help to paint a better picture of the type of person she was.
  • Take the time to look back on your own memories of her. Spending time to reflect several years later can help us develop new perspectives on those we love.

How are you celebrating Mother’s Day this year? Share with us in the comments below!

 

To learn more about the ones you love and to help plan more meaningful services, download our free guide for making end-of-life arrangements.